Science News

Science News

Science News

The Amazing Dollhouses of Death

A woman designed the tiny dioramas to teach forensic science.

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Posted: September 22, 2017, 8:00 am

Mysterious 'Pink Tube' Creature Baffles Ocean Divers

The real identity of the mass was even more surprising.

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Posted: September 22, 2017, 8:00 am

Creepy and Surprising Epitaphs

What do you say on your tombstome when you really want to say something?

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Posted: September 22, 2017, 8:00 am

Canada's Best-Documented UFO Encounter Celebrates Its 50th

Some have called it 'Canada's Roswell.'

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Posted: September 22, 2017, 8:00 am

Edward Snowden's Privacy Tips

The renowned hacker says to avoid Dropbox, Google, and Facebook.

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Posted: September 22, 2017, 8:00 am

Hearing offers peek at what Uber stands to lose in Waymo trial

With three weeks to go until the explosive Waymo v. Uber trial begins, court-watchers got a peek Wednesday at the hefty price tag Uber could face if it loses.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 11:50 pm

A new recruiting platform combines talent-seeking tech with psychology

Celectiv, a recruiting platform that combines talent-seeking tools with analytical tech like organizational psychology assessments, is coming out of stealth mode to launch.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 9:30 pm

Caricatures become an obsession

For Anokhy Desai, a new haircut or outfit requires more than a trip to the shopping center. These days, she also finds herself also diving into the Bitmoji app to chop hair and replace clothes.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:50 pm

Preterm children have more medical sleep problems but fall asleep more independently

A new study suggests that while healthy preterm children have more medical sleep problems than full-term children, they are more likely to fall asleep independently.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:13 pm

Into more thin air: Exploring the adaptation extremes of human high altitude sickness and fitness

Many research groups have explored human adaptation to high altitude living among three major far-flung global populations: Tibetans, Ethiopians and Peruvians. But few have simultaneously explored the other extreme---maladaptation----in the form of chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Now, in the largest whole genome study of its kind, an international research team led by University of California San Diego's Chairman of Pediatrics, Dr. Gabriel Haddad, has expanded on their recent study of understanding both adaptation extremes in a Peruvian population.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:12 pm

Unique gene therapy prevents, reverses multiple sclerosis in animal model

Multiple sclerosis can be inhibited or reversed using a novel gene therapy technique that stops the disease's immune response in mouse models, researchers have found.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:12 pm

New hope for people with fibromyalgia

A novel psychological therapy that encourages addressing emotional experiences related to trauma, conflict and relationship problems has been found helpful for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:12 pm

Babies can learn that hard work pays off

A new study reveals babies as young as 15 months can learn the value of hard work. Researchers found babies who watched an adult struggle to reach two different goals before succeeding tried harder at their own difficult task than babies who saw an adult succeed effortlessly.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:12 pm

New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects

A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3-D rendering methods.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:12 pm

Facebook to release Russia ads to Congress amid pressure

Facebook says the company will provide the contents of 3,000 ads bought by a Russian agency to congressional investigators.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:02 pm

NASA measures Hurricane Maria's torrential rainfall, sees eye re-open

Hurricane Maria has caused catastrophic flooding in Puerto Rico and left a wake of heavy rainfall that NASA measured using a fleet of satellites in space. NASA satellite imagery also saw Maria's eye close up as it tracked across Puerto Rico and re-open after its exit.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 8:01 pm

Neanderthal boy's skull grew like a human child's: study

The first analysis of a Neanderthal boy's skull uncovered in Spain suggests that he grew much like a modern boy would, in another sign that our extinct ancestors were similar to us, researchers said Thursday.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 7:35 pm

In space capsules, little room but big improvement

In 1961, an American astronaut reached space for the first time and soared through the heavens in a gumdrop-shaped capsule.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 7:30 pm

Ozark grasslands experience major increase in trees and shrubs

Woody vegetation, such as trees and shrubs, has increased dramatically in Ozark grasslands over the past 75 years, according to a study published this week in the journal Landscape Ecology.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 7:24 pm

New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects

A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3D rendering methods. The ability to create detailed, 3D digital versions of real-world objects and scenes can be useful for movie production, creating virtual reality experiences, improving design or quality assurance in the production of clear products and even for preserving rare or culturally significant objects.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 7:11 pm

Mayo Clinic offers first aid assistance via Amazon's Alexa digital assistant

Alexa, forget my grocery list and morning traffic reports. Tell me about CPR.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:40 pm

Scientists sequence asexual tiny worm whose lineage stretches back 18 million years

A team of scientists has sequenced, for the first time, a tiny worm that belongs to a group of exclusively asexual species that originated approximately 18 million years ago -- making it one of the oldest living lineages of asexual animals known.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Ancient DNA data fills in thousands of years of human prehistory in Africa

By sequencing the ancient genomes of 15 individuals from different parts of Africa, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on Sept. 21 have reconstructed the prehistory of humans on the continent, going back thousands of years. The findings shed light on which human populations lived in eastern and southern Africa between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago, the researchers say.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Your neurons register familiar faces, whether you notice them or not

When people see an image of a person they recognize particular cells light up in the brain. Now, researchers have found that those cells light up even when a person sees a familiar face or object but fails to notice it. The only difference is that the neural activity is weaker and delayed in comparison to what happens when an observer consciously registers and can recall having seen a particular image.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Japanese encephalitis vaccine cuts disease rate in Nepal

From 2006 through 2011, Nepal conducted a mass immunization campaign against Japanese encephalitis -- a mosquito-borne viral disease. Now, investigators have reported that the vaccination effort prevented thousands of cases of Japanese encephalitis (JE) and cut JE rates in Nepal by at least 78 percent.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Synthetic molecule 'kicks and kills' some persistent HIV in mice

Scientists have designed a synthetic molecule that can reactivate dormant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in mice and lead to the death of some of the infected cells, according to a new study.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Dancing electrons lose the race

Ultrashort pulses of light were employed by physicists to start a race between electrons emitted from different initial states in a solid material. Timing this race revealed an unexpected result: the fastest electrons arrived in last place.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:13 pm

Early trilobites had stomachs, new fossil study finds

Exceptionally preserved trilobite fossils from China, dating back to more than 500 million years ago, have revealed new insights into the extinct marine animal's digestive system. The new study shows that at least two trilobite species evolved a stomach structure 20 million years earlier than previously thought.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Rapid hepatitis C testing may help better screen young adults

Routine and rapid hepatitis C virus testing among young adults who use injection drugs improves life expectancy and may provide a good use of limited resources, according to new research.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Reconstructing how Neanderthals grew, based on an El Sidrón child

How did Neanderthals grow? Does modern man develop in the same way as Homo neanderthalensis did? How does the size of the brain affect the development of the body? Researchers have studied the fossil remains of a Neanderthal child's skeleton in order to establish whether there are differences between the growth of Neanderthals and that of sapiens.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves

Poison frogs harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know, yet scientists have long wondered -- how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? Scientists are now a step closer to resolving that head-scratcher. And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Jellyfish, with no brains, still seem to sleep

The discovery that primitive jellyfish sleep suggests that sleep is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved behavior.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Detecting cosmic rays from a galaxy far, far away

Where do cosmic rays come from? Solving a 50-year-old mystery, a collaboration of researchers has discovered it's much farther than the Milky Way.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:12 pm

Exosomes are the missing link to insulin resistance in diabetes

Chronic tissue inflammation resulting from obesity is an underlying cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. But the mechanism by which this occurs has remained cloaked, until now. In a new paper, researchers identified exosomes -- extremely small vesicles or sacs secreted from most cell types -- as the missing link.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:11 pm

Physicists publish new findings on electron emission

Even more than 100 years after Einstein's explanation of photoemission the process of electron emission from a solid material upon illumination with light still poses challenging surprises. In the report now published in the journal Science ultrashort pulses of light were employed to start a race between electrons emitted from different initial states in a solid material. Timing this race reveals an unexpected result: The fastest electrons arrive in last place.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:00 pm

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves

Don't let their appearance fool you: Thimble-sized, dappled in cheerful colors and squishy, poison frogs in fact harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know. With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists are a step closer to resolving a related head-scratcher—how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:00 pm

Detecting cosmic rays from a galaxy far, far away

In an article published today in the journal Science, the Pierre Auger Collaboration has definitively answered the question of whether cosmic particles from outside the Milky Way Galaxy. The article, titled "Observation of a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmicrays above 8 × 1018 eV", notes that studying the distribution of the cosmic ray arrival directions is the first step in determining where extragalactic particles originate.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:00 pm

We must accelerate transitions for sustainability and climate change, experts say

We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2oC this century, experts have warned.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:00 pm

Early trilobites had stomachs, new fossil study finds

Exceptionally preserved trilobite fossils from China, dating back to more than 500 million years ago, have revealed new insights into the extinct marine animal's digestive system. Published today in the journal PLOS ONE, the new study shows that at least two trilobite species evolved a stomach structure 20 million years earlier than previously thought.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 6:00 pm

Don't want the new iPhone? Try these smartphone alternatives

Three new versions of the iPhone have just been announced, and while they may be light years ahead of Apple's previous models, they may not be for everyone. Looking for a quality smartphone not made by the big A?
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 5:40 pm

Review: Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 is the phone Note 7 users have been waiting for

We interrupt the iPhone mania of late to remind you there are other flagship phones on the market, including the much-anticipated Samsung Galaxy Note 8.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 5:30 pm

Study links juveniles' views of police with likelihood of aggressive behavior

Although many juvenile offenders report that they believe they have experienced police injustice, little has been known about how this perception of police injustice may impact future behavior.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 5:20 pm

Fast radio bursts may be firing off every second

When fast radio bursts, or FRBs, were first detected in 2001, astronomers had never seen anything like them before. Since then, astronomers have found a couple of dozen FRBs, but they still don't know what causes these rapid and powerful bursts of radio emission.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 5:01 pm

Blood metal ion levels can identify hip replacement patients at low risk of ARMD

Patients with 'metal on metal' artificial hips are at risk of complications caused by adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). A study confirms that blood metal ion levels specific to the type of hip implant used can help predict patients who are at low risk of ARMD.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:58 pm

How staph cells dodge the body's immune system

For years, medical investigators have tried and failed to develop vaccines for a type of staph bacteria associated with the deadly superbug MRSA. But a new study shows how staph cells evade the body's immune system, offering a clearer picture of how a successful vaccine would work.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:58 pm

Mercedes-Benz to invest $1 billion in Alabama, add 600 jobs

Carmaker Mercedes-Benz announced Thursday that it will invest $1 billion to set up electric vehicle production at its Tuscaloosa, Alabama plant and to build a battery factory nearby, moves it said would create 600 new jobs.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:58 pm

Hack of US regulator a blow to confidence in financial system

The hack disclosed at the US Securities and Exchange Commission deals a fresh blow to confidence in the security of the financial system weeks after news of a potentially catastrophic breach at a major US credit bureau.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:51 pm

Billionaire gives $30M to Univ. of Arizona for Biosphere 2

Texas billionaire Edward P. Bass is giving $30 million to the University of Arizona to support the Biosphere 2 research facility.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:50 pm

Students at National Air and Space Museum to Speak with Space Station Astronaut

Students at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 12:25 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 27, as part of a “STEM in 30” broadcast.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:47 pm

Fed agency urging corporate cybersecurity upgrades is hacked

The federal agency responsible for ensuring that markets function as they should and for protecting investors was hacked last year and the intruders may have used the nonpublic information they obtained to profit illegally.
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Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:20 pm